Tag Archives: David Horst

Timbers 2, Dynamo 0: Porter’s Perfect Plan Dismantles Dom’s Destroyers

It’s easy, in the warm afterglow of a 2-0 victory, to look back and think “of course the Timbers would do that“, but it never looked that obvious or simple going into the game against Houston. This really looked like a big test of Caleb Porter, coming hot on the heels of a tough trip to Colorado.

That game wasn’t pretty, but Porter has shown that even at this early stage he’s not afraid to change things up from week to week. After starting the same XI in the opening two home games, he’s made five line-up changes in the next three games, the same number John Spencer made in the first five games of 2011 and 2012. In the Scot’s first year he played the same line-up from game to game on two occasions, and two of his line-up changes were forced by injuries, so there was a sense that he was pretty settled on his ideal team and system early on. Porter’s changes post-loss to Montreal have been the clearest contrast to the “old ways” – he’s showing a willingness to adapt and change to find the right mix for that particular game. It didn’t work against Colorado, but it would work back at Jeld-Wen Field.

New Coaches

Thinking back to that debut season, game five was the Timbers’ second win of the season, beating Dallas 3-2. Things were looking good after a shaky start. In the next five games the Timbers would play a settled XI on three occasions, with the three players introduced to the starting XI being Troy Perkins, Diego Chara and Darlington Nagbe. After ten games, the Timbers had a perfect home record, with five wins from five. The record wouldn’t last eleven games, and the Timbers would lose six of the next seven and kiss goodbye to the playoffs.

I don’t know that we’ll see such a settled selection from Porter. Certainly, the injuries in this match aren’t part of the plan and Horst’s in particular puts a real strain on the backline. I’m sure Tucker-Gangnes is a big part of Porter’s plan, but I don’t think it’s this soon as he seems the ideal candidate to do what Andrew Jean-Baptiste did last season and get a spell on loan before being thrown into the mix against experienced strikers. Does anyone think Futty Danso is the solution?

There’s still time till the end of the transfer window for the Timbers to add to the defence, though I wouldn’t be surprised to see the Timbers experiment there, even if just for a spell at the end of a (hopefully comfortably won) game. With confusion surrounding the long-term status of Hanyer Mosquera, the likelihood being that Mosquera is a Timber no more, perhaps getting another defender in was already part of the plan.

The Houston match already featured a change in the centre of defence, the second in two weeks. Silvestre returned to partner David Horst, but Porter’s big change was to introduce Rodney Wallace to the starting line-up, with Ben Zemanski sitting this one out. Jack Jewsbury dropped back into the right-back role he held for a spell last year – a run of matches that included victories against Seattle and San Jose. I had come to think that today would be a great opportunity to introduce Wallace to the first XI, but I had him replacing Diego Chara in the same 4-3-3 that been deployed since Jewsbury’s return to the team. My thoughts were that Wallace offered a little more in attack, something we needed to support the attacking three and I worried that Diego Chara would get drawn into a kicking match with the Dynamo midfield, and that that could lead to the Timbers putting themselves in trouble.

Shows why I write a blog and Caleb Porter coaches a Major League Soccer club. Porter kept Chara in the side, and the Colombian had the kind of game that alerted those outside the #RCTID bubble to just how good we already knew he was.

Rather than slot Wallace in alongside Will Johnson in midfield, Porter returned to the 4-2-3-1 with Wallace playing on the left and Darlington Nagbe going right. This brought Diego Valeri back into the centre where he could be more effective.

Tactical Changes

I was a little surprised to see the team return to this formation as it had caused the team problems in the opening couple of matches, leaving the team short in the middle and exposed on the flanks, but Porter countered this by playing an asymmetrical formation where the left was more your “traditional” wing, with a wing-back pushing up to support and overlap the attacking midfielder, and the right saw Nagbe given license to roam inside knowing that Jack Jewsbury would sit back and cover the space behind.

HOUearlyformation Jewsbury took his place in a back five that had a combined age of 155, with the return of Mikael Silvestre to the defence alongside David Horst. There can be few Timbers backlines that have carried such a wealth of experience, and it told throughout the match. The way the team were lined-up, it essentially took more of a 3-3-3-1 shape in possession, with the most experienced and best technical players on the outside of the three at the back

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The Dynamo made their intentions clear early on with a very physical approach. I’m sure this came as little surprise to the Timbers, and early on the team did well to get their passing rhythm going despite the close attentions of their opponents.

It was the interplay of Diego Valeri and Darlington Nagbe that gave me most hope in those early stages.

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Without a proper outside-right threat down that flank, it was up to Valeri and Nagbe to work it between them, with occaisional support from Chara or Jewsbury. The Timbers worked their first shot in the game in eight minutes from a move started by a pass from Nagbe to Valeri that also displayed the early tempo and rhythm the Timbers had to their passing and movement.

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F-ing the P-word

For all the expectation, or at least hope, that Porters arrival will see the start of a real blossoming of young talent, I think his greatest job in this first year will be in getting an improvement from guys who are running out of time to fulfill their potential. Rodney Wallace being a prime case in point. He’ll be 25 in June, but has thus far failed to hold down a position in the starting line-up. It’s been hard to see where Wallace’s best position is. Is he a left-back, or a winger, or is he a central midfielder? We’ve seen him play well, and we’ve seen him play not-so-well , in all these positions but he’s never really gone out and stamped himself upon a role on a consistent basis.

Porter’s answer, so far, is that Wallace is all of those things, and none of them. He can cover at any one of them, and do well, which makes him very valuable in a system where he’ll have to do them all, often in the course of a few minutes. One start, and four sub appearances are too soon to call whether Wallace will be one of the defining stories of 2013, but he certainly brings something new to the table. Including a functioning left foot. Are you taking notes, Mr Nagbe?

In the same bracket as Rodney Wallace are guys like Kalif Alhassan and, to an extent, David Horst. Kalif started the season in the line-up, but dropped out on the road. His return to the team here was in far from ideal circumstances, replacing Diego Valeri when his face got up-close and personal with Taylor’s elbow.

A quick word on that foul. Yes, it wasn’t nice and when someone has to go off with such an obvious injury of their face, you kinda assume that someone would have to be booked for that, but going by US Soccer’s guidance on the difference between reckless and careless tackles (one being deemed caution-worthy, the other not) you can see how the ref would see Taylor’s actions as careless than reckless. I’m inclined to agree, for what it’s worth, though it’s never nice to see one of your guys on the receiving end. Still, I wonder if there’s a Dynamo blog starting a campaign to get Taylor a red card?

Alhassan did well when he replaced Valeri, and it helped the team that the three behind Johnson all knew each other well already. I don’t doubt Alhassan’s ability, but getting consistency out of him would give the Timbers a potent threat across the attack.

I feel for Horst as it looked like he had a chance to establish himself in the first team, but his injury means he’s now going to be out for months. If the Timbers do sign another defender, you wonder where that leaves Horst because I doubt Porter would want a mere stopgap signing. He’s 27 and has only started 35 MLS matches – of the 9 MLS veterans in the starting team, Horst had the fewest top level starts. There’s no reason why Horst couldn’t have another six or seven years in him, but it’s going to be tough for him losing so much time with a new head coach.

Probably the biggest example of a guy who’s potential has been touted, but needs to start cashing the cheques his early hype was writing is Darlington Nagbe. When Valeri exited proceedings, Nagbe moved into the central role. I had hoped to see Alhassan there as I think his ability to do something even he didn’t expect could be the key to unlock the Dynamo defence, but Nagbe seemed to take the added responsibility on his shoulders and did well in the role.

It was, by far, his most mature persformance for the Timbers. There have been better games, but today we saw a player step up a level and, after a rocky spell as Houston “harried” at the start of the second half, Nagbe settled into his role and didn’t look like the rookie who would try and force something to happen and disappear into his shell if it didn’t.

Clashing Styles

Despite a little wobble after the injury to Horst, after which the Dynamo forced a few set piece chances, the Timbers controlled the first half in terms of possession, in spite of some, ahem, forceful pressing by the Dynamo. I’m not opposed to physical play, it was pretty much the only play I had growing up watching Scottish football, pre-Sky TV, but there’s a line where physical can cross over into dangerous and it’s up to the ref to draw that line, and draw it early. I don’t think Ricardo Salazar did that, and it just emboldened Houston to keep it up to the point that I’m just happy we got through the second half without anyone else leaving significantly more broken than when they stepped on the field, routine potential Donovan Ricketts injury aside.

To the Timbers credit though, they stood up to the challenge. Not many clubs would’ve lost two starters, including the guy who was being billed as your playmaker, and come through to win by two goals. They did it by standing toe to toe with Houston when the game got scrappy, losing only 51% of duels, which helped limit Houston to only one shot on target.

Old Heads

The second half began with Portland controlling the tempo of the game, forcing Houston to defend on the edge of their own penalty box as they probed for a way through. The visitors were limited to one shot at goal from distance by the Ghost of Rosters Past, Adam Moffat, which skidded past Ricketts’ left hand post.

Defensively the team relied on the experience of Jewsbury and Silvestre to cover for Jean-Baptsite, who’d replaced Horst. AJB has a big future, but he’s still raw and as important as knowing when to put the young players in is to a coach’s ability to develop talent, so is knowing when to pull them for their own good, whether it’s to protect them, or keep their feet on the ground.

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Jean-Baptiste most likely has a run of games ahead of him now, and a chance to prove that he’s ready for a starting role now. I’m pleased to see his progression as I thought he was a talent in those first games last season and while he still has plenty of rough edges, he has tons of MLS and international experience around him now. I certainly hope he does it as I’d rather be answering the question of who replaces Silvestre in a year or so than still wondering whether Jean-Baptiste is ready.

Plan B: Just like Plan A, but with goals.

The Timbers created their first good chance early on when Nagbe worked a give-and-go with Wallace but tried awkwardly to wrap his right foot round a ball that was screaming out for a left foot to stroke it past the keeper. The run, and the instinct to get forward were great, but the finish was lacking, and probably underlines why he’s not a guy to lead the line as, despite being a scorer of spectacular goals, his best work goes in before the finish.

HOUgoal1passesThen, 53 minutes and 34 seconds into play, Kalif Alhassan battles to win back a ball in right midfield, near the halfway line. He’s knocks it all the way back to Ricketts. The keeper surveys his options before going wide left to Silvestre. Silvestre forward to Harrington on the touchline, and then back to the ex-Arsenal man. He goes cross-field to Jewsbury, and gets it back from the right-back before he knocks it forward to Harrington again. This time the left-back has time and space and picks a ball down the line to Wallace, who knocks it back to Harrington. The ball crosses the backline to Jewsbury via Jean-Baptiste and a quick give-and-return with Alhassan is the first time the ball has crossed the halfway line.

Jewsbury rolled it Jean-Baptiste, who passed it on to Silvestre, before the ball was returned back to Jewsbury. Like they had with Harrington down the left, they’d worked the ball around for a second look at the Houston flanks, this time working down their left. This time Jewsbury played it inside to Chara who, with a bit of luck, worked a give and go with Nagbe and then sent over a truly magnificent cross for Ryan Johnson to finish. Twenty passes across seventy seconds of possession with purpose, culminating in a fantastic cross and goal. Every Timbers player except Will Johnson touched the ball in the build-up and the cross a thing of beauty that no screencaps would suffice to describe. Just go watch it again. The whole move. Welcome to the 2013 Timbers, this should be fun.

Comfort Zone

With the lead for the first time this season, the Timbers went for the jugular. In the period between the two goals, the Timbers maintained a pass accuracy of 82% and had upped the tempo from 6 passes per minute before the first goal to 9.6 after it. There would be no attempt to bunker down on a one goal lead here.

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The Timbers still committed four players to the attack, confident that a back three with Harrington moving between attack and defence, and the Chara-Johnson partnership in the middle screening them would take care of any Dynamo threat.

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Wallace struck the bar with a blast from distance that would’ve been fine reward for his work before Ryan Johnson got his second of the night, and put the result, even so early, beyond any real doubt. That second goal came about when Nagbe won the ball, and worked a couple of passes with Alhassan before releasing Johnson free of the offside trap. Johnson finished it like a 20 goal a season striker, and Caleb Porter could breathe a little more easily.

Houston had a bit more possession after the 2nd goal, but they never really threatened Ricketts’ goal, and it was Portland who went closest to scoring the game’s third when Nagbe went close after a fine pass by Alhassan put him in.

More Questions

The second half performance from Portland is as good as I can remember from the Kings of Cascadia. They were assured and focused, and determined not to be out-fought in ways that they precisely haven’t been in the last couple of years.

The fact it came with Valeri is all the more remarkable. Where the team looked a little rattled and off the boil in the minutes after Horst’s injury, the injury to Valeri seems to have galvanised the team into even greater efforts.

A number of guys came into the team, or into new roles, and gave good accounts of themselves. Jewsbury was the calm head at the right-back that we knew he would be, and his lack of pace was never really exposed as the defence put in their best shift of the season by far. Where this leaves Zemanski and Miller in the short-term at least is in the air, though we can’t even be sure that Porter will play the same system against San Jose, despite it working here. We’ve seen Spencer fall into that trap in the past, and I’m sure Porter won’t want to make the same mistakes.

Nagbe grew into the “number ten” role as the game went on, and while I’m sure Valeri still heads the queue in that particular position, Darlington sent out a message loud and clear that he can step up and fulfill that function really well. Alhassan’s showing after coming on was the kind of performance you want to shake out of Kalif more often.

Wallace was my man of the match. There wasn’t much in it, but I felt that he added a lot to both sides of the ball in a role that asked him to wear a lot of different hats. He was given a chance in this game, and he snatched it up with both hands. Let’s see if he can build on this.

Porter goes into the next double-header against San Jose with two very different selection headaches. One on hand, the sudden lack of depth at centre back is a big concern, perhaps not on a game-to-game basis, but the risk of disaster is ever present. On the other, he has a lot of guys playing well and pushing for spots on the team.

Spencer’s Timbers peaked between April and May of 2011, and would never really hit those heights again. Porter’s job will be to make sure his team peak in October and November, and performances like this lead me to believe that we are certainly on the right path.

Believe beyond reason was the mantra of last year. Believe with reason is my mantra for this.

#RCTID

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What Now?

Well.

That was pretty damn awful, wasn’t it?

Shy of sticking a finger in the eye of the Colossus of the North (who thought that a single win at CLink meant that they should be handed the Cascadia Cup and were shocked, shocked that the Whitecaps weren’t willing to help them out worth a lick) the past season was pretty much a washout.

We got our coach fired, went one match away from going winless on the road, and generally exposed the weaknesses and problems in the side that the Front Office had spent the past two years ostensibly building. Two days after the final match of the second MLS season we find ourselves back, if not where we started in 2011, at least no better off than we were at the beginning of 2012.

Ugh.

So the obvious question is: where can we go from here, and how do we get there?

We’ve got a new coach coming on board sometime in the winter, there will probably be some roster changes, and MLSTimbers v.3.0 will get a rollout sometime in the late winter. Obviously we can’t know much or do anything about this but speculate.

But speculate we can, so why not? That’s why we’re here.

First, let’s take a look what we have now.

Individually I want to suggest that the flaws in Gavin Wilkinson’s player selection can’t be better displayed than through a quick look at the present Timbers roster. In my biased opinion the current side is dominated by two kinds of players; the “consistent but limited” and the “limited by inconsistency”. We just flat out don’t have any players with consistent, genuinely game-breaking talent, the sort of marquee player that our rivals have in people like Wondolowski or Montero. Yeah, I hate those guys, too, but I can’t deny their quality. We just don’t have that and the record seems to show that we never will.

So what do we have, and what does that tell us about our Front Office’s tendencies to pick and choose players?

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The way I see it the Consistently Limited make up the bulk of the side.

With these guys you know what you’re going to see. They bring pretty much the same game every time they run on the pitch. It’s not that they can’t play, or that they’re hackers and goofs. They’re all at least substitute-grade MLS quality guys. But their game, that game we know we’ll see, is lacking in one way or another. These guys all have a shortcoming, or shortcomings, that put a limit on their ability to produce winning soccer in one way or another.

Starting from the back we have Ricketts, whose limitation seems to be primarily age and fragility that comes with a history of injury, and the Bendik/Gleeson binary star, limited merely by their inexperience – though Bendik seemed to be at least a solid journeyman during his limited stint this season.

On the backline we have Mosquera, limited by his judgement and inability to communicate with his linemates, and Kimura who is limited in so many aspects it’s hard to figure out where start. In midfield we have Wallace and Palmer, who are sort of the Mosquera and Kimura of the center of the pitch; the one makes constant errors of judgement while the other is simply a quandary; why is he doing this for a living and I’m not?

Diego Chara, whose effort and defensive sturdiness are unquestionable is limited by his inability to keep from getting called for fouling and his poor forward passing. Jack Jewsbury is simply not young enough and mobile enough anymore to have more than a moderate impact.

Up front Bright Dike is limited by his poor touch and sloppy finishing, while Kris Boyd is limited simply by his style of play; without good distribution and service from the midfield he is simply wasted up top.

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The Limitedly Inconsistent are a minority on the team, but an important one. With these guys you never know whether they’re going to bring their A-game, or whether that game is going to last the entire match. They show streaks of brilliance matched with random outbursts of mediocrity or outright blunders.

David Horst is the poster child for this group. A stand-up guy who anchors the backline for 89 minutes he will suddenly make a horribly mistimed lunge, or stab, or find a way to mark space, or do something that will gift the enemy a goal. You love to see him most of the time, and then tiny remainder you look away because it’s like a car accident unfolding on the Sunset Highway at rush hour.

In midfield Darlington Nagbe who to me is still something of an enigma labelled “potential”; will he be the Nagbe that passes accurately and can score a clinical goal, or the one that gets knocked off the ball and is marked out of the game mid-match? Kalif Alhassan is another skilled but unpredictable midfielder; you never know which Kalif will show up – will it be the one that can provide a lovely assist, or the one whose crosses float over the entire 18 like a shiny soap bubble? Some matches Sal Zizzo is a speedy winger and clinical crosser while others earn his nickname “Zig Zag Zizzo”, running aimlessly about and lofting random high balls into the blue. Franck Songo’o can provide brilliance in attack and sturdy defence but can also repeatedly dribble into trouble and wander about seemingly at random.

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Of the entire current side there’s one guy who I would say has grown into a solidly dependable player who is both consistent and relatively skilled; Steven Smith. A liability in the back at first his play in the last half of the season has progressed to where he’s among the best of our defenders – yes, a low bar but, still – and has shown promise going forward. Of the current group of starters he seems the best rounded and most skilled.

Of the remainder we don’t really have any solid indicators. Eric Alexander has shown signs of being in the second group but his minutes have been so limited as to make that pure speculation. Eric Brunner was a hell of a defender prior to his injuries but hasn’t been a standout in the short stints he’s played in the late season; hard to tell how well he will come back, if at all. Jean-Baptiste showed well against San Jose on Sunday, but he is one of the large group of young players we just haven’t seen enough of this season to really judge. Brent Richards has looked better tracking back than he did in his earlier outings but his play retains the erratic quality of a young player. And we’ve just seen way too little of guys like Hogg, Kawulok, Purdy, Fucito…

But in general, given what this group seems to tell us about Gavin’s – or Gavin and Merritt’s – weakness in assessing players we need to assume that these young players are likely to have similar weaknesses. This seems to be the Front Office’s style; they see either only the strengths of the consistent-but-limited players, or the “manic phase” of the skilled-but-inconsistent players while not noticing the weaknesses of the one and the depressive phase of the other.

And we need to assume that if this same group continues to pick the players for the incoming coach we are likely to see very similar sorts of players next season. Gavin’s record, in particular, goes back to the USL days and was very like this; Portland saw players like Mamadou Keita and Ryan Pore, inconsistent guys who could play but would tend to drift out of the match, or the season, or guys like Scot Thompson and Takayuki Suzuki; good solid players but just not the sort that got you to the league championship finals.

This is likely to be it; this is likely to be “who we are” until and if we get a new group in the executive suite.

So the question is; how do we go forward, how do the Timbers get better, with these sorts of players?

And that is the subject of the next post.

Unfinished business

I’ve been writing this for days now. I’ve only just decided to start over. Bear with me. I’m going to write fast and see if I can get the words out before they become too much of a mess. Apologies in advance.

I’ve been a little haunted since the reserves match Sunday. It was a fun game and, after Saturday (when I missed the derby to attend a memorial service), it felt… healing. It felt like going home after a long, drawn-out absence.

I never thought I’d see Kris Boyd play in a reserves match, but there we were. And he looked good. He was active and engaged and, within the first ten minutes of the match, had an assist and a goal.

And then it felt like the end.

Did we just see Kris Boyd’s last goal as a Timber?

My heart hurts to think about it.

After several games on the bench, limited minutes and a view from the sidelines of a derby match, his injury against San Jose has set me on edge. Maybe that was it. Maybe that reserve match goal really was Kris Boyd’s last wearing our club’s badge.

A couple days ago, another member of the Timbers Bloggers Battalion posed this question: if I could bring back only five players next year, who would they be? I warned him that my picks would be entirely emotion-driven.

Eric Alexander, of course, because I know he can do more. Diego Chara for the effort he puts in every time he suits up for us. David Horst for the sheer fact that I want to see him beat the crap out of the OTHER Eddie Johnson sometime in the near future. Mike Fucito because I can’t help loving that little hobbit.

And, it will come as no surprise, Kris Boyd.

Boyd makes the list not just because of my ridiculous fan-crush, but because I think he has some unfinished business here.

If we go back to the “Cubbie incident“, we remember that Cubbie tried to paint him as the failed savior of the Timbers 2012 season and the reason John Spencer was fired. Lame.

But, watching Boyd struggle since then, it seems he took it to heart. He’s had flashes, momentary glimpses of the player he should be, but those have been few, separated by long instances of Gavin-imposed exile.

So, what happens now? The season is coming to a close, the playoffs are beyond our reach. Boyd’s one-plus-one contract is weighing on my mind.

Will he stay? Does he want to stay? Does incoming manager Caleb Porter want him to stay?

I want him to stay. I want him to succeed. I’m a sucker for a romantic comeback story and the scene is set for one here.

Here’s the thing: I loved Kenny Cooper. I will always keep a special place in my heart for Kenny. Soft-spoken, polite, misused Kenny Cooper.

And now, I wait to see what happens to Kenny’s replacement. Kenny, let’s remember, is currently among the league’s leading scorers. For another club that figured out how he works.

Here’s to hoping that we get a second chance at figuring out how Kris Boyd works. If anyone from the Timbers coaching staff needs me to point them in the right direction on this one, I’ve got a fair few Youtube videos I can point out.

So, here, because I feel I need to, a few words not *about* Kris, but to him.

Stay. If the choice is yours to make, I hope you choose to stay. The Portland chapter of your story is still being written. Don’t leave in the middle. Stay and become a legend, not just a footnote in our history.

I was there at the press conference when you were introduced to the Timbers faithful. I was there for your first goal at Jeld-Wen. I stood with you, shoulder to shoulder, at midfield during a season ticket holder event and looked up into the North End and I imagined a day in the future when I would tell my kids about this guy, this legendary Scottish striker that, by some odd turn of luck, ended up here in Portland.

I hope that, after I tell them about your rocky first year, I will be able to tell them about your triumphant comeback in your second year here, when you led the league in scoring and led our club deep into the playoffs.

Help me tell that story, Kris.

Give me a story to tell.


You can read more from Kristen at her blog.


[post_ender]

The Defence Rests

After a win last weekend that gave hope – albeit of the remote kind – that the Timbers could make the play-offs, the team did their level best to extinguish those flames in the return fixture against Colorado Rapids as the old road woes returned.

Even though I had my doubts about the home performance against the Rapids, I understood why Wilkinson lined up the same XI again. The team has been pretty settled of late, and while they were getting results it’s hard to argue against sticking with the same formula.

However, the Timbers started slowly and within the first minute the Rapids had hit the post and Timbers fans settled in for the now-familiar bumpy ride.

That initial chances came when Kimura misread a long ball and got caught out. Not the first time Kimura had misjudged things, and won’t be the last. It’s a startling statistic to think that Kimura has played in 11 or the Timbers 27 matches this season (39.3% of total game minutes), yet has been on the pitch as the team has lost 24 of the 46 goals it’s shipped (52.2% of goals lost). It’s a chicken and egg situation – is the defence so much worse because Kimura is there, or did Kimura come in as the defence was already slipping bearing in mind he played under John Spencer only once and so has been here through the shocking run of results under Wilkinson.

I like the Japanese full-back (going forward, mostly) but this is a game he’ll want to forget. A terrible return to his old stomping ground.

The Timbers went 1-0 down early on when Kimura tried to clear the ball with an odd head flick that did nothing but set up the Rapids attacker. With less than 10 minutes played ,the tone had been well and truly set. Indeed, there was a marked difference to how the Timbers approached the first 10 of the home match, compared to here.

In the first match, we were able to get the wingers involved in the final third early on, whereas here we spent much of our time going from side to side with very little forward penetration. It was possession that just kind meandered nowhere in particular.

Any time the Timbers did get into a position to attack the Rapids rearguard, the final ball was invariably lacking in quality.

Up top, Dike was having a hard time getting involved in the play, often having to come deep to get a touch. His running, which had been an asset in previous matches, wasn’t up to the standard here as he seemed to make the wrong choice more often than not.

He tries to run in behind the defender, which is admirable, but you can see quite clearly that Dike would have to thread the ball through the eye of a needle to get it to him. The better decision would’ve been to offer himself up for a ball to feet, and link the play, or to go the other way and try to create a space for Nagbe to drive towards.

Toiling in attack, the Timbers were looking decidedly shaky at the back. Kimura looked rattled after the initial five minutes, and never seemed to recover (how he made it full-time, let alone half time, I can’t explain other than Wilkinson really didn’t trust Kawulok) while the midfield were allowing the Rapids too much room to put passes together.

The Rapids 2nd goal was a fine example of the midfield failing to do it’s defensive work.

At each point along, you can see how much space the Rapids players have to pass or cross. Songo’o perhaps should’ve got across to close the cross down a bit sooner after Smith was dragged away by the intelligent outside run. Kimura lets his man get away from him, and neither of the defenders is quick enough to react to the rebound.

The second half followed much the same formula as the first. Wilkinson decided against any changes at half-time as presumably he was loving the possession, a fact he brought up in a post-match interview as a source of pride as we’d kept the Rapids to only 50.6% of the play instead of the 60% they had when we last visited. I’m sure the Rapids were crying into the pillows that night as they lost that crucial 9.4% of possession that meant they could only equal the 3-0 scoreline, while restricting us to fewer shots on target, stats fans.

In a way, beating Colorado in Portland may have been the worst thing that could’ve happened as it lulled the team into a false sense of security. I felt we were very fortunate to get a win out of them, and said on twitter before the match that my fear was that the Rapids wouldn’t miss the kind of chances they did last week again.

Still, I’m sure that the coaching staff would take that on board and change it up for this match. Nope? Still, they’d definitely change it at half-time when we were 2-0 down and toiling badly. Right?

The change did finally come midway through the second half when the Ghost of John Spencer made a like-for-like change in throwing on Kris Boyd for the ineffectual Bright Dike. Dike had missed a glorious chance earlier when he blazed a deep cross from Zizzo high over the bar. It was the first time we’d really managed to work that ball down the channel inside the full-back, with Zizzo – the team’s best, and some might say only, performer on the night – scampering to reach Kimura’s pass at the byline.

On another night, Dike would’ve blazed the ball into the night and fans would’ve been raving about his performance once again, but such are the margins a striker works with that he misses it and is hauled off soon after.

Boyd had a cameo role in the Timbers best chance of the night.

It was well worked, and came out of nothing, right up until the finish from Chara who showed why he’s more the guy you want giving the ball to the goalscorer, than trying to be one. Had that gone in, it might’ve set up an exciting end to the match, but it didn’t. Wilkinson as good as threw up his hands and gave up, chucking on every striker who happened to cross his eye line in some mad scientist attempt to conjure up a goal without seemingly having any idea how that would happen.

The Rapids nabbed a third when a deep corner saw Jewsbury lose his man, the ball was nodded back across and Kimura was bullied out of the way, with Castrillon’s header slipping through Ricketts.

Another frustrating night and the play-off dream is as dead as the look in Michele Bachman’s cold, shark-like eyes. In attack we were lifeless and flaccid – Franck Songo’o was largely anonymous and Nagbe struggled to make his presence felt through the centre – and in defence, well, there is no defence.

Kimura had a shocker, that’s for sure, but none of the defensive line really emerge with much credit from a bad night at the office. The breakdown of this defence was, for me, summed up in one little moment in the second half.

This little passage of play is indicative of the kind of sloppy errors we’re making the back, time and again. What David Horst hopes to achieve here, I’m at a loss to explain. Presumably he wants Smith to follow Akpan so he can, what, close the ball down or go mark Castrillon? But closing down the ball is Jewsbury’s job, and Smith has enough on his plate with Horst having a brainstorm beside him. As it is, Horst kind meanders into space, does nothing, and the ball is simply knocked in behind him, leading to a good chance to score.

The lack of communication is shocking at times, and here we have a defender who doesn’t really seem to know what he’s doing. And this breakdown from a back four that have played together more than any of the other 20-plus configurations we’ve seen this season.

And yet, despite that almost 10 hours of game time, as well as countless hours on the training pitch, they still play like they only just met in the tunnel before the match.

It seems that, with these four, Wilkinson has (for now) settled on his defence. Continuity is important, especially in a defence where split second timing can be crucial, in stepping forward to spring an offside trap for instance. The fact is though, for me, this defence looks no better now than in their first match together. The same mistakes kept being made, and by the same people.

Looking at the central pairing, there have been five configurations. Horst/Mosquera has been used most often (855 minutes) with Brunner/Mosquera 2nd on 519 minutes. Danso with Mosquera or Horst both log 360 minutes, and Brunner/Jean-Baptiste is on 336 minutes.

As you can see, Brunner/Mosquera has been the most steady central pairing, and one can only speculate as to how the season may have unfolded had Brunner remained injury free. As for the “worst” pairings.. Well, they share one common factor. David Horst.

I love his heart and passion, but I question his defensive “brain”. Too often he switches off, or makes the wrong choice and we’re not a team that are going to outscore opponents 4-3. We can’t afford liabilities at the back.

No doubt the injury to Brunner has forced the coaching team’s hand. Danso, it seems, has paid the price for his part in the 5-0 drubbing in Dallas, presumably because someone had to be punished for that. And yet, in his three matches with Mosquera, other than the Dallas debacle, he helped keep two clean sheets, with the defense leaking a single goal over 270 minutes of play. Again, taking that 5-0 result out of the records, when Danso was in the defence, the team lost a goal (on average) every 70 minutes – better than any other central defenders’ figures (Brunner 61, Jean-Baptiste 56, Mosquera 54, Horst 47).

A similar thing happened to Horst after the 5-3 loss to LA, but Danso hasn’t been able to find his way out from under the bus since Frisco as Horst holds on to his place in the team. With Brunner’s appearance on the bench, it would seem like Horst’s time is up any game now, but it’s still perplexing to me why Danso has paid such a high price for a bad game, while Horst is a continued source of anxiety in defence.

Meanwhile, Jean-Baptiste has returned from a loan spell and can’t get a look in. I liked how he shaped up earlier in the season. He’s raw, there’s no doubt, but he need to play to smooth those ragged edges down.

I worry that his time out may have mythologised Brunner’s talents, as there is a habit for fans to inflate the abilities of those that aren’t playing. Regardless, we need him back, as much for Hanyer Mosquera’s well-being as anything else!

I’m sure that, for all his credentials as an attack-minded coach, Caleb Porter will be making sorting out the defence a priority in the off season. Until we can be confident about what’s behind us, we can be sure in going forward.

The Timbers have a weekend off to mull this result over before picking themselves back up for the visit of the mob from up the road. Cascadia Cup glory beckons.

#RCTID


[post_ender]

We Are Legend

First off, I’ll just say I’m writing this on my iPod, which isn’t ideal. So no pics, and I’ll keep it brief. But The Timbers won. They beat Seattle, and there was simply no way I couldn’t talk about the game yesterday.

The tone for the day was set by the Army’s epic Clive Charles* tifo. As it rose, it snagged and tore a bit, but great work by the Timbers Army crew freed it up, and as the sun broke through, the full splendour of many hours of work was revealed.

On the pitch, the team also met similar problems. In the second half Seattle had us pinned back for long spells, threatening to spoil an outstanding start that had seen the Timbers race to a 2-0 lead, and only the most fervent of fans wouldn’t have felt queasy as time wore on.

Disaster, as it was with the tifo, was averted. Two first half goals had given the Timbers the cushion they needed to hold out during a second half that threatened to descend into chaos at times.

gif by @pyratejackKris Boyd’s opener came from a great low cross from Steven Smith, slotted home from six yards as the Seattle defence took leave of their senses. David Horst head butted the team into a two-goal lead shortly after from a corner.

The Timbers were rampant for much of the first half. Fucito buzzed around the attack, and Alhassan and Songo’o were finding joy where last week there was only woe.

Smith’s reintroduction to the team gave them an overlapping threat down the left that was so lacking against LA.

A quick word about Songo’o. I thought this was his best showing for the Timbers. He looked like he had purpose whereas previously he’s looked like he’s floated around with no clear goal in mind.

I still felt his best work came centrally – fortunately with Smith back in the team we had some width to compensate – with his behind-the-leg pass for Fucito in the second half a particular delight.

Also, I think it’s time to declare my man-crush on Diego Chara. I’m almost scared to considering my record – *cough*Perlaza*cough* – but seriously, how freaking good is this guy?

Watching the replay, I was mesmerised watching the Colombian dynamo. The guy is unflappable in possession.

The complaints about Xavi “only passing sideways” have largely died down as people have come to realise that he’s actually pretty ok at football.

So with Chara. Okay, he might not harvest tonnes of assists or send a fifty yard crossfield pass onto a sixpence, but watching him is a lesson for all kids on how to do the “simple” things well.

Three guys around him? No problem, he’ll pass through them. Snapping at his heels? He’ll lay it off and spin round you to get the pass back.

He never panics and kicks it away. He keeps his head up and finds his man, and then he’ll move and look for it right back.

He’s the beating heart of the team.

As well as a Xavi-like ability to circulate the ball so efficiently, he also has, to borrow another Barca/Spain player, the defensive instincts of a Busquets.

There was one point in the second half where he dived in to make a block, then got up and harried the play back from the edge of the Timbers box to the centre circle.

His play was a large part of why, even as Seattle pressed, the Timbers were able to hold them off.

Seattle’s attacking strategy was reduced to either shooting from distance, or falling over to generate set pieces.

Eddie Johnson, who seemed to have sharpened his elbows before kick-off, seemed to have a particularly tenuous relationship with gravity. Perhaps he suffers from Drogba’s Disease?

And Montero… He played like one of those entitled 16 year old shits who’ll scream the mansion down cos their daddy bought them a red Porsche instead of a black one. Fredy thinks the world exists to serve him and won’t take no for an answer.

When things weren’t going his way, he became ever more petulant. It’s a wonder he was able to go more than five yards without tripping over his bottom lip.

The ref has to take a portion of the blame. Time and again Montero, and a few of his cohorts, resorted to shoving and elbowing. If the ref had drawn a line earlier on and made it clear it wasn’t going to fly, perhaps some of the later unpleasantness could’ve been avoided.

Instead, Montero got away with what he wanted until Horst made sure he couldn’t wave it away. A weak performance by a ref who let himself be controlled by the match rather than the other way round.

The little shitehawk got his just desserts late on with a red card, at least.

It was a great day to be a Timber. It was a complete 180 from the LA match.

It’s still too early to declare a corner has been turned yet. I don’t like going negative after a match like that, but…

I wasn’t impressed with much of Nagbe’s work. He seemed a yard off the pace of the game at times. He seemed to get caught in possession far too often.

Similarly, at the back things aren’t perfect. Despite his goal, and providing a real threat from set plays, Horst still showed his worst side with a poor effort to win the ball in the build up to Seattle’s goal.

Teams will still generate a number of decent chances against us, but on this day Perkins came up big again.

The potential loss of Alhassan for a spell is also a blow after injury forced him out. The Ghanaian can have you pulling your hair out at times, but is always capable of a dazzling piece of trickery.

Let’s not end on negatives though. This may be the last Timbers game I catch live this season, and if so it’s a great way to go.

Legends were born yesterday.